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Social Action/Social Change

This concentration is designed for students interested in exploring the “real world” implications and emancipatory possibilities of their work in the social studies and allied disciplines. Students interested in this concentration must complete two introductory social sciences courses before moderating. Additionally, students need to complete four additional courses, with at least two at the 300-level (14 credits), as well as an eight to 12 credit internship. In Moderation, students should identify a coherent set of interests that link past/future coursework and their interest in this concentration as well as their proposed internship. Internships here are broadly defined and may include work with advocacy and activist groups, traditional social service organizations, government and nongovernmental organizations, and placements that might be part of a junior semester abroad. Students in this concentration are encouraged to draw upon the internship and related experiences in their Senior Theses.

Introductory Courses

History 101/207 The Tricks We Play on the Dead: Making History in the 21st Century
Politics 100 Introduction to Politics
Sociology 100 Introduction to Sociology

Courses

African American Studies 100 Introduction to African American Studies
Intercultural 313 CP Liberation Theology and Latin America
Literature 293m Media Studies Practicum I
Literature 294m Media Studies Practicum II
Politics 206 Seminar in Comparative Politics
Psychology 203 Social Psychology
Women’s Studies 101 CP An Unfinished Revolution: Introduction to Women’s Studies
Women’s Studies 213 Women Writing Activism: Changing the World
Women’s Studies 270 CP Caribbean Women Writing Resistance

Recent Senior Theses

“Migration and Identity: The Lives of West African Women in the United States”
“Lands on the Edge of Land: Imagining Jewish Peoplehood and Attachment to Israel”
“The Curious Case of the Cosmic Race: Mestizaje and National Identity in Post-Revolutionary Mexico”
“When Did Battering Become a Crime? A Study on the Institutionalization of Domestic Violence in Puerto Rico”

Faculty

Asma Abbas, Nancy Bonvillain, Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez, Christopher Coggins, Susan Lyon, Francisca Oyogoa, Nancy Yanoshak
Faculty Contact: Francisca Oyogoa
Internship Contact: Susan Lyon